The Schengen Agreement for the implementation of the Schengen Agreement of 14 June 1985 between the governments of the States of the Benelux Economic Union, the Federal Government of Germany and the French Republic on the phasing out of controls at their common borders The Schengen Agreement paved the way for the Schengen visa to enter into force. Although this is not part of the original provisions of the agreement, the top 15 countries need only a visa for all. The Schengen visa may allow non-EU members to travel freely to the countries participating in the programme. In December 1996, two non-EU states, Norway and Iceland, signed an association agreement with the countries that signed the Schengen accession agreement. Although this agreement never entered into force, the two countries were part of the Schengen area following similar agreements with the EU. [9] The Schengen Agreement itself was not signed by non-EU states. [10] In 2009, Switzerland officially concluded its accession to the Schengen area by adopting an association agreement by referendum in 2005. [11] ACCORD between the governments of the States of the Benelux Economic Union, the Federal Republic of Germany and the French Republic on the phasing out of controls at their common bordersThe governments of the BELGIC ROYAUME, the FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY, the REPUBLIC OF FRANCE, the GRAND DUCHY OF LUXEMBOURG and the ROYAUME OF THE NETHERLANDS, , aware that the tightening of the union of the peoples of the Member States of the European Communities is the expression of the freedom to cross the internal borders of all nationals of the Member States of the European Communities The Committee on Energy, Energy, Research and Policy of Research, Research and Policy of Research and Employment Policy and Employment Policy and Research Policy employment policy aims to strengthen solidarity among their peoples by removing barriers to free movement at the common borders between the states of the Benelux Economic Union. , the Federal Republic of Germany and the French Republic, considering that progress has already been made in the European Communities to ensure the free movement of people, goods and services, with a view to removing controls at their common borders for the movement of nationals of the Member States of the European Communities and facilitating the movement of goods and services at these borders and facilitating the movement of goods and services at these borders. CONSIDERING that the implementation of this agreement may require legislative measures, which must be submitted to the parliaments of the signatory states in accordance with their constitutions, in view of the declaration of the European Council of Fontainebleau of 25 and 26 June 1984 on the abolition of police and customs formalities applicable to persons and goods crossing intra-EU borders, in view of the agreement reached in Sarrebruck on 13 July 1984 between the Federal Republic of Germany and the French Republic “COMPTE TENU conclusions of 31 May 1984, following the meeting of the transport ministers of Benelux and the Federal Republic of Germany in Neustadt an der Aisch, taking into account the memorandum of the governments of the Benelux Economic Union of 12 December 1984 to the governments of the Federal Republic of Germany and the French Republic, “HAVE AGREED AS FOLLOWS:TITLE IMEAS APPLICABLE IN THE SHORT TERMArticle 1Sobald of this agreement and until all controls are fully abolished, the formalities applicable to nationals of the Member States of the European Communities are carried out at the common borders between the states of the Benelux Economic Union, the Federal Government of Germany and the French Republic, according to the following conditions. Article 2This, as far as the transport of persons is concerned, the police and customs services carry out, from 15 June 1985, a simple visual surveillance of private vehicles crossing the common border at reduced speed without having to stop.

However, they can perform more thorough checks through sounding checks.