The British Parliament must proceed with two authorisation procedures before the UK can ratify the withdrawal agreement. Both the EU Law (Withdrawal Act 2018) and the Constitutional Reform Act 2010 and the Governance Act (CRAG) are obstacles to the UK`s ability to ratify the negotiated agreement. The Withdrawal Act also provides for parliamentary procedure in the event of a rejection of an agreement by the House of Commons or if a negotiated agreement is ever reached. The withdrawal agreement between the European Union and the United Kingdom sets out the conditions for the UK`s orderly exit from the EU, in accordance with Article 50 of the Treaty on european Union. Both the draft withdrawal agreement and the political declaration have a potentially considerable impact on the British Constitution. Some of the constitutional issues that are likely to arise in each bill on the implementation of the withdrawal agreement are as follows: For more information on the joint committee and the governance structures put in place by the VA, see Section 7 of the Briefingpapers 8453 of the Commons Library. Note that this briefing was on the November 2018 version of the VA. The VA was revised in October 2019, but the governance structures and the main body of the agreement remained unchanged. The protocol on Ireland and Northern Ireland has been extensively revised. See Briefing Paper 8713, The October 2019 EU UK Withdrawal Agreement The UK has opted for the implementation of a system requiring EU citizens to apply for a new resident status known as “settled” or “pre-settled” status. It is not yet clear whether each EU-27 will exercise its discretion under the withdrawal agreement to force British residents to apply for a new resident status.

If the EP approves the agreement by a simple majority, it will have to be adopted by the EU by the overqualified majority of the European Council of the remaining 27 Member States (20 from the other EU-27 representing 65% of the EU-27 population). Free movement will continue until the end of the transition period (or transposition period) and EU and UK nationals will be able to move to the UK or Member States, as currently permitted by EU legislation. EU citizens living in their host country before the end of the transition have a permanent right of residence under the withdrawal agreement due to certain requirements. Under the agreement, the UK and EU-27 have discretion under which EU or UK nationals must apply for new resident status. The government has pledged to vote on a resolution in both houses of Parliament before the Edo-Speaker votes, where each parliament is asked to approve the withdrawal agreement. So far, the British Parliament had had two “wise votes” but had not approved the November 2018 withdrawal agreement, despite assurances from the EU in January 2019 that the backstop should not be permanent and other interpretations and clarifications in March 2019. The Strasbourg clarification package and the Attorney General`s opinion will be discussed in the Commons Briefing Paper 8525 The Strasbourg package, 13 March 2019.