…? 3. If the oral and documentary evidence was misinterpreted and the claimant was not entitled to a specific benefit, but only to damages within the meaning of section 14(A) of the Specific Relief Act?.. Question 3 and 4: With regard to question 4, I cannot find any material that can prove that the treaty has been novationated. After keeping questions #1 and 2 against the level. and ready to fulfill its part of the contract and an amount of rule 30,000 / – was paid to the applicant”, the findings were in favour of the applicant and, therefore, a decree. Similarly, Article 5(g) of the KS Law imposes stamp duty to be paid for an agreement for the sale of movable property. In the event that the holding of movable property is delivered or agreed without the performance of an act of transfer, the stamp duty provided for in this contract is 3% (3%) of the consideration or market value of the property, whichever is greater. Since the transfer provided for in the agreement is the transfer of an undertaking as a whole, it cannot be explicitly assimilated to the transfer of movable or immovable property. The Daesh law and the state stamp laws do not contain specific provisions that impose a tax on a “transaction” transfer agreement as such. Therefore, it is essential that any asset that is to be transferred to the buyer under a BTA be individually labelled as mobile or immobile for stamp duty purposes.

The collection of stamp duty depends on the State where the agreement is executed. In order to improve clarity, we should look at the impact of stamp duty on a BTA under both central and national legislation. Section 6(2) of the Karnataka Stamp Act sets stamp duty on an agreement to pledge shares to be advanced or to advance as security for the repayment of funds, through loans or existing or future debt. The loan must be repayable on request and the stamp duty thresholds are as follows: the KS Law deviates from the BS Law and the IS Law, taking into account the specific provisions relating to the transfer of movable and immovable property in accordance with Article 5 of the KS Law. . . .